Studio Blup – Remixing Brands Brief – PT 15 – The Demographic – Who, what, when and why.

Studio Blup – Remixing Brands Brief – PT 15 – The Demographic – Who, what, when and why.

 Demographic

Before I dive into designing I want to be sure about my demographic. This will strongly influence how I want to present my brand.

I think a good start is to look at festivals as their demographic is relatively similar to mine.

and of course the demographics of other sportswear companies that Donnay will be competing with. such as Nike, Addidas, Puma etc.

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/pamdanziger/2017/06/19/nike-to-stay-out-in-front-with-biggest-data-of-all-demographics/#1c8ea942432c

Nike To Stay Out In Front With Biggest Data Of All: Demographics

Nike has gotten off to a slow start in 2017. Now three-quarters under, in March the company reported total global revenues up 6% year-over-year, but slowing to 5% in the third quarter. Further North America, its largest global market, grew by only 4% YoY, a pace the company can’t be satisfied with.

At the time Mark Parker, Chairman and CEO, announced its “Triple Double” strategy – 2X Innovation; 2X Speed; and 2X Direct —  focused on doubling down on innovation in performance and style, speed to market, and direct connections with customers through digital, membership and personalization.

Then this past week, Nike followed with an announcement of its “Consumer Direct Offense,” to accelerate product innovation, move closer to the consumer through a Key Cities initiative and to deepen the company’s one-to-one connections with customers. It also plans to unload 2% of its nearly 71,000-strong workforce to create a leaner, meaner corporate profile.

 

Digital strategies will fuel much of the company’s “Triple Double” execution, under a new Nike Direct organization led by Heidi O’Neill, President of Nike Direct, and Adam Sussman, Chief Digital Officer. That, of course, means more reliance on “Big Data” to quantitatively plan product demand, allocate resources and target the right customers with the best offers.

But “Big Data” has an Achilles heel: it relies on past consumer behavior to predict future behavior. And that can prove faulty in today’s consumer marketplace characterized by rapidly changing consumer preferences and shopping behaviors.

That’s why I am intrigued by Nike’s plan to focus on 12 Key Cities in its Consumer Direct Offense:  New York, London, Shanghai, Beijing, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Paris, Berlin, Mexico City, Barcelona, Seoul, and Milan.These are the places the company predicts will generate over 80% of Nike’s projected growth through 2020. Why? Because the company is tapping the biggest, baddest, but old-fashioned data of all: Consumer Demographics.

Demographics is the statistical study of populations. It predicts the composition, size, structure, and distribution of where people live. While the recent refugee crisis in Europe disrupted the normal demographic shifts there, it remains a powerful tool for marketers searching for their best customer prospects today and tomorrow.

WHO?

As the launch of my brand is centred around an event it’s safe to say the age range will be around 18-25 but then I wonder if a family-friendly event would make it more appealing.

For now, I’m thinking the age range for my event should start at 16 as I don’t want to exclude the younger crowd while maintaining an atmosphere that still reflects uk hip hop.

(in a similar way to festivals)

I’m also interested in looking at the demographics of the competitors

https://www.festivalinsights.com/2017/07/uk-festival-market-report-2017/

The UK Festival Market Report 2017

Festival Insights and the UK Festival Awards are proud to release the UK Festival Market Report 2017, an in-depth examination of consumer demographics, preferences and behaviour based on research undertaken from October – November 2016. The insights contained within the Report were gleaned from a sample of 8000 festival-goers who took part in the annual UK Festival Census, an extension of the UK Festival Awards’ voting platform.

Areas covered in the document include attendees’ opinions on ticket prices, improvements they’d like to see implemented at festival bars, what types of music they consume, their most prioritised amenities at festivals, and much more.

Download the full report here.

To check out some excerpts, please see below.

 

Studio Blup – Remixing Brands Brief – PT 13 – NIKE – Nothing Beats A Londoner’

Studio Blup – Remixing Brands Brief – PT 13 – NIKE – Nothing Beats A Londoner’

Out of nowhere, I thought about Nike’s recent advert, celebrating the life of a Londoner. The budget was probably massive, and it Includes loads of Londons top artists and sportsmen/sportswomen.  

The visuals on this ad are top notch, using zoom effect’s and transitions like the A$AP Rocky style effect’s I spoke about in a previous blog post, some really cool X ray and post-production effects too.

With music from artists such as Skepta and Ocean Wisdom, the whole thing has a really fast-paced and upbeat tone. 

 This is a great example of how I can advertise Donnay, except I’ll be looking all over the country for artists and maybe even sports personalities to collaborate with. 

 

 

Nike advert, ‘Nothing Beats A Londoner’: Michael Dapaah, Harry Kane and Skepta in new ad highlighting London’s diversity

Staff Reporter

Nike had released a major new advertisement celebrating London’s diversity, featuring an array of stars including Skepta, Harry Kane, Michael Dapaah and host of other figures from the worlds of sport and music.

Called ‘Nothing beats a Londoner’, the three-minute short film is full of cameos as it shows young sportsmen and women describing the hurdles they face to play the sport they love in the capital city.

The piece opens with grime pioneer Skepta in a cocorner shopalking on the phone as the instrumental to his 2015 hit ‘Shutdown’ plays in the background.

A moment of comedy sees Michael Dapaah, the actor behind Big Shaq of ‘Mans Not Hot’ fame, boast of being best mates with Arsenal’s Alex Iwobi, who then rejects him, with artists J Hus, AJ Tracey and Dave looking on in disapproval.

Mo Farah, Eden Hazard and Dina Asher-Smith also appear in the video, as well as 258 young Londoners taking part in boxing, rowing, swimming, and a host of other sports.

Many on social media were quick to voice their approval:

THIS. IS. AWESOME. The new Nike ad featuring Harry Kane, Iwobi, Hazard, Steph Houghton, Rio & Wrighty. Another level 👏🏽👏🏽 Nothing Beats a Londoner #LDNR #London pic.twitter.com/PuEPjWQwWz

— Jules Breach (@julesbreach) February 9, 2018

Very epic from Nike celebrating our hometown! Love the energy, the cameos and Iwobi’s comic timing LOOOL! Nothing Beats A Londoner #LDNR pic.twitter.com/nWE88lwJ2x

— Pai Mei Ray 🇩🇲🇬🇩 (@studiopixie) February 9, 2018

Some took the scenes of crowded, council-run sports facilities as a veiled criticism of former London mayor Boris Johnson’s running of London:

This new Nike advert is amazing with the cameos. And also lowkey roasts the hell out of Boris Johnson’s terrible stint as Mayor. Beautiful. https://t.co/fGpmixHx15

— Carl Anka (@Ankaman616) February 9, 2018

Nike will launch a campaign during February half-term week across 270 sports venues in the city in which Nike-sponsored athletes will meet communities and play sport with young people.

Studio Blup – Remixing Brands Brief – PT 12 – Learning about DONNAY

Studio Blup – Remixing Brands Brief – PT 12 – Learning about DONNAY

TOP BRANDS – SPORTS DIRECT.

A hundred years of tennis heritage and the brand that catapulted Bjorn Borg to World number-one. Donnay is the go-to brand for those who play tennis as a hobby, and those professionals seeking quality and function.

Donnay was the first brand acquired by IBML who now own the worldwide rights. A host of international stars have been associated with the brand including five-time Wimbledon Champion Björn Borg and Career Grand Slam winner Andre Agassi.

Recognised for its range of high-quality tennis products Donnay is well known for its successful clothing and equipment ranges that are suitable for all ages.

Donnay provides functionality and quality along with value for money. As a leader in the tennis world, it is an iconic brand built for the professional and used by those with a passion for tennis. It believes in empowering the customer, achieving success whilst continuing to deliver world-class sporting equipment.

 

Wikipedia Article Donnay

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donnay_(sports)

 Although I know from past experience not to put my full trust into Wikipedia for 100% factual information. There are surprisingly few places to look for information on Donnay. 

 

 

Donnay Sports is a sporting goods brand owned by the British retailer Sports Direct International. The company was founded in 1910 by Emile Donnay and was based in Couvin, Belgium. Donnay manufactured wooden tennis rackets from 1934, and by the 1970s was the largest manufacturer of tennis rackets in the world. However, the company failed to adapt to the new market for graphite rackets, and entered administration in 1988. After a succession of owners, the brand was eventually sold to Sports Direct, who continue to license the use of the brand worldwide.

Donnay rackets were used professionally in Europe by Björn Borg from 1975 until his retirement in 1983. Other professionals included Andre Agassi, Rod Laver and Greg Rusedski.

 

 

 

History Of Donnay

(according to Wikipedia) 

The company was founded in 1910 by Emile Donnay (1885 – 1972) as a wooden tool handle manufacturing co-operative with six employees.

[1] Emile Donnay had little education and a modest background.[2]The company began to diversify into other wooden products, including a bow for archers, which continues to be reflected in the Donnay bow-shaped logo.[3] In 1924 Donnay built premises in Couvin.[4]

The company manufactured its first tennis rackets in 1934.[5] In the early 1950s the company won a valuable contract to produce tennis rackets for Wilson.[6]

Björn Borg using a Donnay racket in the final of the 1979 ABN Tennis Tournament in Rotterdam

 

By 1969 Donnay was the world’s largest manufacturer of tennis rackets. By the early 1970s, Donnay was producing 2 million rackets a year, 1.3 million of which were shipped to Wilson for distribution.[6] Production suffered in 1973, when Wilson relocated its tennis racket production to Taiwan.[6]

In 1981 Donnay produced 1.8 million rackets, almost all made from ash.[7] The company failed to adapt to the changing market for the new lightweight graphite rackets.[6] The company produced only 3,000 graphite rackets in 1980, instead concentrating on wood and aluminium rackets.[6] The company continued to manufacture wooden rackets until 1984, by which time they were obsolete.[8]

Buoyed by the success of signing up Björn Borg as a Donnay user, the company employed 600 people and manufactured around 1.5 million tennis rackets a year.[1] In 1981 Donnay reported a turnover of 2.1 billion Belgian francs. Donnay’s fortunes began to fade when Borg retired in 1983.[6] Its success had been too closely aligned with Borg’s success, and the company lost money for four years before entering administration in 1988 after amassing debts of $35 million.[6][9] 

The company had apparently lacked the negotiation skills to attract another player of Borg’s standing as a figurehead.[1]

The Donnay family still controlled 55 percent of the company when it went bankrupt in 1988.[1] The Walloon and Belgian governments held the remaining shares.[1] The company was acquired by a group of investors, led by Bernard Tapie with a 51 percent stake, the Walloon government with 29 percent and Albert Frere with 20 percent.[9] In 1991 Tapie sold his 58 percent stake in the company to the Walloon government for $16.2 million in order to finance the acquisition of Adidas shares.[10] 

The government sold the factory to an Italian sports equipment manufacturer, Carbon Valley, and retained the brand rights.[10] In December 1992 the Walloon government took ownership of the company in order to prevent it from entering administration again.[11]

In 1996 SportsDirect acquired the worldwide rights to the Donnay brand from the Walloon government for $3.9 million.[12] At the time of the acquisition, production was based in Portugal, while 23 people remained employed at a distribution center in Couvin.[12] SportsDirect sells Donnay products as an in-house brand and licenses its production of Donnay branded products overseas.

[13] SportsDirect also separately licenses the brand to independent manufacturers and sellers of Donnay branded products, including tennis racquet production in the United States. [14]

 

Donnay Sports is a sporting goods brand owned by the British retailer Sports Direct International. The company was founded in 1910 by Emile Donnay and was based in Couvin, Belgium.

Donnay manufactured wooden tennis rackets from 1934, and by the 1970s was the largest manufacturer of tennis rackets in the world.

Donnay rackets were used professionally in Europe by Björn Borg from 1975 until his retirement in 1983. Other professionals included Andre Agassi, Rod Laver and Greg Rusedski.

The company manufactured its first tennis rackets in 1934.[5] In the early 1950s the company won a valuable contract to produce tennis rackets for Wilson.[6]

By 1969 Donnay was the world’s largest manufacturer of tennis rackets. By the early 1970s, Donnay was producing 2 million rackets a year, 1.3 million of which were shipped to Wilson for distribution. Production suffered in 1973, when Wilson relocated its tennis racket production to Taiwan.

Donnay’s fortunes began to fade when Borg retired in 1983.[6] Its success had been too closely aligned with Borg’s success, and the company lost money for four years before entering administration in 1988 after amassing debts of $35 million.[6][9] 

The company had apparently lacked the negotiation skills to attract another player of Borg’s standing as a figurehead.[1]

The 1980s Snauwaert Ergonom tennis racquet